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How To Use Predictive Analytics In Healthcare?

How To Use Predictive Analytics In Healthcare
What is predictive analytics in healthcare exactly? – Predictive analytics in healthcare is a process of analyzing historical healthcare data to identify patterns and trends that may be predictive of future events. Predictive analytics in healthcare can be used to predict the likelihood of particular health conditions, clinical decisions, trends, and even spread of diseases.

  • By using predictive analytics in healthcare, providers can make more informed decisions about which treatments to offer patients and how best to tailor those treatments to individual needs.
  • Predictive healthcare analytics can also help to identify patients who are at risk for complication or relapse and provide interventions before problems occur.

Overall, predictive analytics has the potential to improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare delivery. Predictive analytics has become an invaluable tool for healthcare organizations, as it helps them make better-informed decisions and uncover hidden opportunities in their data.

Data and analytics technology is used to detect patterns and trends in order to make predictions about patient outcomes, improve care quality, reduce healthcare costs, increase efficiency, and more. Physicians can use predictive analytics to diagnose diseases accurately and quickly, while hospitals can use it to identify high-risk patients or forecast the need for resources.

Insurance companies have also adopted predictive analytics models to gain a better understanding of customer behavior. Leveraging a predictive model, healthcare organizations are able to make smarter decisions that benefit both patients and providers alike.

  1. With a predictive analytics model, the healthcare industry is better equipped to address some of its most pressing challenges.
  2. It is an invaluable tool in the fight against disease and a key factor in improving patient outcomes.
  3. By taking advantage of a predictive analytics tool, healthcare organizations can ensure they are making the most of their data and resources to provide the best care possible.

This will not only improve patient outcomes but also help reduce costs for patients and providers alike. With predictive analytics, healthcare has become more efficient, reliable, and cost-effective than ever before. From better diagnoses to improved resource management, predictive analytics is helping make the healthcare industry more efficient and effective.

What are 4 example of applications of predictive analytics?

Conclusions – Many industries use predictive analytics to improve their results and anticipate future events to act accordingly. You can find successful applications in retail, banking, insurance, telecommunications, energy, etc. Neural Designer is a data science and machine learning platform specialized in easily building predictive models.

What is the use of AI and predictive analytics in healthcare?

Using AI-based predictive analytics solutions, the healthcare sector can block high-risk activity, monitor their data in real-time, and implement multi-factor authentication (MFA) to enhance cybersecurity. This can help to prevent data breaches, protect patient information and ensure the continuity of care.

How do we use predictive analytics?

3 Things You Need to Know – Predictive analytics uses historical data to predict future events. Typically, historical data is used to build a mathematical model that captures important trends. That predictive model is then used on current data to predict what will happen next, or to suggest actions to take for optimal outcomes.

What are predictive analytics tools in healthcare?

What Is Predictive Analytics in Healthcare? – Predictive analytics is a discipline in the data analytics world that relies heavily on techniques such as modeling, data mining, AI, and machine learning. It is used to evaluate historical and real-time data to make predictions about the future.

Predictive analytics in healthcare refers to the analysis of current and historical healthcare data that allows healthcare professionals to find opportunities to make more effective and more efficient operational and clinical decisions, predict trends, and even manage the spread of diseases. Healthcare data is any data related to the health conditions of an individual or a group of people and is collected from administrative and medical records, health surveys, disease and patient registries, claims-based datasets, and EHRs.

Healthcare analytics is a tool that anyone who is in the healthcare industry one way or another can use and benefit from to provide better-quality care – healthcare organizations, hospitals, doctors, physicians, psychologists, pharmacists, pharmaceutical companies, and even healthcare stakeholders. How To Use Predictive Analytics In Healthcare

What is an example of prescriptive analytics in healthcare?

The case for Prescriptive Analytics in Healthcare – Prescriptive analytics is a type of data analysis that uses historical data to predict future events. The healthcare industry can use prescriptive analytics to recommend patients’ or providers’ best course of action.

  • It can also compare multiple “what if”scenarios.
  • For example, if a healthcare provider is considering adding a new service, prescriptive analytics can assess the impact of choosing one service over another.
  • With it, healthcare decision-makers can optimize business outcomes and make more informed decisions about patient care.

In a hypothetical example, a health insurer uses predictive analytics to spot a pattern in its claims data. The previous year shows a significant portion of its diabetic patient population also suffers from retinopathy. The insurer then estimates the probability of an increase in ophthalmology claims during the next plan year.

What is a real life example of predictive analysis?

Higher Education – Use cases for predictive analytics in higher education include management, retention, fundraising, and retirement. In all these domains, predictive analytics provides intelligent insights that give you an edge over others. The predictive analytics application can score each student based on their high school data and inform the administrators on how to support them over their courses best.

What is the most used technique in predictive analytics?

Types of Predictive Analytical Models – There are three common techniques used in predictive analytics: Decision trees, neural networks, and regression. Read more about each of these below.

Which tool is used for predictive analysis?

2. IBM Watson Studio – IBM became a leading predictive analytics tools vendor with the acquisition of SPSS in 2009. SPSS was founded in 1975 and grew into one of the top statistical and analytics packages over the years. IBM continued to innovate the vendor’s core capabilities and integrated them into its more modern Watson Studio on IBM Cloud Pak for Data platform. How To Use Predictive Analytics In Healthcare

What is predictive care for at risk patients?

Need Care organizations need an efficient way of monitoring and prioritizing care for at-risk patients once they are discharged from hospital to home in order to help avoid emergency room visits. Solution Philips Cares predictive analytics engine integrates data from Philips Lifeline records, medical alert activity and other sources.

Predictive care: when a patient may need intervention by virtue of being at risk for emergency transport over the next 30 days. Population health management: Creates a daily risk score for clinicians to enable them to monitor their panel of patients more effectively and efficiently.

What AI algorithms are used in healthcare?

1. Artificial neural network – Artificial neural network (ANN) is often referred to as the most ‘humanized’ machine learning algorithm. ANNs sequentially filter incoming information based on set parameters and usually require minimum human involvement during training. In the healthcare context, they are often used for as well as text and speech recognition. Logistic regression is typically used to predict which outcome out of two is likely to happen. Its binary nature makes it comparatively easy to implement, which is why it’s one of the most popular machine learning algorithms in healthcare. Besides predicting an outcome probability, logistic regression allows users to see how important each variable is for the final outcome. Unlike linear regression algorithms, support vector machines (SVMs) are generally used for classification problems. In simple terms, the further the data points are from the y axis on the graph below, the higher the probability is that they belong to the respective classes.

Who uses predictive analytics in healthcare?

What is predictive analytics in healthcare exactly? – Predictive analytics in healthcare is a process of analyzing historical healthcare data to identify patterns and trends that may be predictive of future events. Predictive analytics in healthcare can be used to predict the likelihood of particular health conditions, clinical decisions, trends, and even spread of diseases.

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By using predictive analytics in healthcare, providers can make more informed decisions about which treatments to offer patients and how best to tailor those treatments to individual needs. Predictive healthcare analytics can also help to identify patients who are at risk for complication or relapse and provide interventions before problems occur.

Overall, predictive analytics has the potential to improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare delivery. Predictive analytics has become an invaluable tool for healthcare organizations, as it helps them make better-informed decisions and uncover hidden opportunities in their data.

  1. Data and analytics technology is used to detect patterns and trends in order to make predictions about patient outcomes, improve care quality, reduce healthcare costs, increase efficiency, and more.
  2. Physicians can use predictive analytics to diagnose diseases accurately and quickly, while hospitals can use it to identify high-risk patients or forecast the need for resources.

Insurance companies have also adopted predictive analytics models to gain a better understanding of customer behavior. Leveraging a predictive model, healthcare organizations are able to make smarter decisions that benefit both patients and providers alike.

With a predictive analytics model, the healthcare industry is better equipped to address some of its most pressing challenges. It is an invaluable tool in the fight against disease and a key factor in improving patient outcomes. By taking advantage of a predictive analytics tool, healthcare organizations can ensure they are making the most of their data and resources to provide the best care possible.

This will not only improve patient outcomes but also help reduce costs for patients and providers alike. With predictive analytics, healthcare has become more efficient, reliable, and cost-effective than ever before. From better diagnoses to improved resource management, predictive analytics is helping make the healthcare industry more efficient and effective.

What is one example of predictive analytics?

How To Use Predictive Analytics In Healthcare Problem: For manufacturers, equipment failure can mean business failure. Machine downtime can cost millions of dollars a year in lost profits, repair costs, and lost production time for employees. Benefits: By embedding predictive analytics in their applications, manufacturing managers can monitor the condition and performance of equipment and predict failures before they happen.

They can plan ahead and reallocate the load to other machines to reduce any impact on production. Data to Analyze: Data may include maintenance data logs maintained by the technicians, especially for older machines. For newer machines, data coming in from the different sensors of the machine—including temperature, running time, power level durations, and error messages—will be very useful.

You can use a few different predictive techniques to teach your model how to flag machines that may need attention soon:

  • Map sensor readings against the actual state of machines, In this approach, you run a simple clustering algorithm (K-means) to see if sensor values from different machines can logically put those machines into three different groups, then compare the groupings created by the algorithm with the actual states of the machines. Ideally, the outcome for the groups generated by the algorithm will match the reality, and you can apply the model to predict future states with relative accuracy.
  • Identify correlations between sensors, Predictive analytics models may be able to identify correlations between sensor readings. For example, if the temperature reading on a machine correlates to the length of time it runs on high power, those two combined readings may put the machine at risk of downtime.
  • Predict future state using sensor values, Since the machine status is a known value, you can run a classification algorithm (for example, Gradient Boosted Model) to create a predictive model that predicts the state of the machine based on sensor values. This model can be subsequently used to predict and flag the state of machines based on the combination of new sensor values.

How To Use Predictive Analytics In Healthcare Actions to Take: Once you have trained your predictive model, you can use it to determine the likelihood of breakdowns. Plan ahead to shut machines down for preventive maintenance as needed. You can also use predictive analytics to limit or prevent any impact on your production pipeline. How To Use Predictive Analytics In Healthcare How To Use Predictive Analytics In Healthcare Problem: Whether you work at a bank or in accounting for a business, any finance professional knows how much of a disruption missed payments can be. Financial groups with outstanding invoices need to know who will—and who will not—pay their bills on time.

Benefits: By predicting which individuals or businesses will likely miss their next payment, financial groups can better manage cashflow. They can also take steps to mitigate the problem by sending reminders to potential late payers. Data to Analyze: The predictive analytics solution can analyze company or individual demographics, products they purchased/used, past payment history, customer support logs, and any recent adverse events.

Actions to Take: Once the financial group knows who is likely to pay their bills late, they can send payment reminders. Predictive analytics can recommend the best date and time to send reminders, as well as the best mode of contact (for example, text message, email, or phone call).

  • Problem: Many creative tactics can be used to commit insurance fraud, including staged incidents, withholding or falsifying information, and making fraudulent transactions.
  • Benefits: Insurance companies can use predictive analytics technology to track and monitor potential scammers, without spending time sorting through every claim.
  • Data to Analyze: The predictive analytics algorithm can consider the location where the claim originated, time of day, claimant history, claim amount, and even public data such as the,

Actions to Take: By applying the model to new claims, insurance companies can quickly detect suspicious activity. Any claim that appears abnormal is marked as an outlier. Claims that are likely to be fraudulent will be put on hold and sent back to investigators for further review.

  1. Potential alerts can also be cross-referenced with information in public registers, like the, to reduce the likelihood of false leads accompanying legitimate ones.
  2. Investigators can use the analysis to refine their approaches to fraud.
  3. And because the patterns may reveal new types of risk, insurance companies can add new threats to their watch lists as well.

Problem: Customer churn has always been a difficult metric to understand for SaaS (Software as a Service) companies. Most churn applications tell you how many customers churned last month and how much money was lost. But they fail to find correlations to tell you what kinds of customers are likely to churn.

  1. Benefits: With predictive analytics, product managers can forecast and mitigate churn with much more precision than typical analytics tools—which can lead to significant revenue.
  2. Say your enterprise SaaS company has an average churn rate of 1 percent per month (12 percent per year).
  3. If you’re at $30M ARR, you are churning close to $4.5M per year.

If you reduce churn by just 2 percent a year, you can save close to half a million dollars.

  1. Data to Analyze: The predictive analytics algorithm should consider customer demographics, products purchased, product usage, customer calls, time since last contact, past transaction history, industry, company size, and revenue.
  2. Actions to Take: Actions may include an automated email showing the customer how they can get more value from the application, or a trigger to the customer success team to proactively get in touch to understand what can be done to help the customer.

It’s not only important to identify who will churn, but also who will not churn. Predicting which customers will not churn means you can find different ways to engage them with new products or strategic partnerships. accompanying legitimate ones.

What are the three pillars of predictive analytics?

What Are the Three Pillars of Data Analytics? Every business needs a strategy to function with gain maximum profit as well as sustain itself in the market. More than earning a profit, sustaining in the market is a big matter these days. Therefore, it is a must to use the latest data analytics techniques instead of just relying on the data available.

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Speed Agility Performance

As we mentioned earlier, you cannot depend just on the available data and take a decision for your business. Rather you have to incorporate the latest data analytics techniques to get real-time data on the market situation and devise a strategy accordingly.

This kind of data analytics cannot be done with a usual CPU. Because the machines performing the analytics has to take up a lot of input data and process them using several mathematical tools to achieve results. Traditional CPUs are not equipped with such power and need a greater processing capability from high-end processors.

These machines have to deal with AI and machine learning algorithms which take up millions of data points and learn from them. So, it is important to have a machine with high-speed processing. Such devices are made possible with the help of GPUs. Graphic cards enable you to perform n-number of tasks parallelly.

Read what InetSoft customers and partners have said about their as their production reporting tool.

What is the difference between predictive and prescriptive analytics in healthcare?

What is Prescriptive Analytics? – To understand how prescriptive analytics can benefit the healthcare industry, it helps to know what sets it apart from other types of analytics. While some experts classify them differently, the primary branches of analytics include:

Descriptive analytics: which seeks to answer how something happened. Diagnostic analytics: which seeks to answer why something happened (sometimes combined with descriptive analytics). Predictive analytics: which seeks to answer if something will happen again. Prescriptive analytics: which seeks to answer how a company should respond.

The distinguishing feature of prescriptive analytics is that it goes beyond the findings of descriptive, diagnostic and predictive analytics to formulate a plan. Rather than simply projecting future outcomes as predictive analytics does, prescriptive analytics manipulates one or more inputs to evaluate the conditions of multiple outputs and then delivers recommendations as to how to reach the most optimal outcome.

Which is one of the best example prescriptive analytics?

Here are some common examples of prescriptive analytics and types of prescriptive insights provided by advanced data analytics tools. Reduce risk by automatically analyzing credit risk or loan default likelihood. Provide better patient care based on patient admission and readmission forecasting.

How is analytics used in pharma?

Data-driven insights for the pharmaceutical industry – The pharmaceutical industry has a longstanding history of relying on empirical data for drug development and distribution. However, sorting through all this data is a monumental task, prompting the industry to turn toward modern solutions such as pharma analytics software to gain deeper insight into critical data.

  • Pharma analytics is the usage and application of data analytics within the pharmaceutical industry.
  • Integrating big data analytics solutions into the pharmaceutical manufacturing process allows companies to gain valuable insights to accelerate and optimize production.
  • Pharmaceutical manufacturers can integrate data analytics throughout every step of the drug development process, from research and discovery to development to clinical trials and beyond.

Pharma analytics allows companies to gain greater insight into consumer demand, drug efficacy and other factors that are critical to overall performance. Pharma analytics allows pharmaceutical companies to improve their decision-making throughout the drug development and marketing processes.

What are the three types of predictive models?

Key Takeaways –

Predictive analytics uses statistics and modeling techniques to determine future performance.Industries and disciplines, such as insurance and marketing, use predictive techniques to make important decisions. Predictive models help make weather forecasts, develop video games, translate voice-to-text messages, customer service decisions, and develop investment portfolios. People often confuse predictive analytics with machine learning even though the two are different disciplines.Types of predictive models include decision trees, regression, and neural networks.

What type of data model is most often used in healthcare?

Relational Databases – Mon states that the most common form of database used in healthcare is the relational database. Relational databases can be used to track patient care in the form of treatments, outcomes of those treatments, and critical indicators of a patient’s current state such as blood pressure, heart rate, and blood glucose levels.6 Relational databases can also be used to interconnect with multiple informational systems throughout a healthcare facility.

For example, a relational database in a cardiac care unit can be directly linked to a hospital’s registration system. Upon registration, a newly admitted patient’s demographic information is sent automatically to the cardiac database using Health Level 7 protocols. This eliminates the need for cardiac care clinicians to input patient information into the database, freeing them to concentrate on providing the patient with the best care possible.

Relational databases have the potential to eliminate paper storage and transfer of information and to answer important questions about healthcare efficacy rather than merely serving as an accounting mechanism. For example, diabetic patients sharing similar health risk factors (for example, slightly overweight, high HbA1c and fasting blood glucose readings) can be closely monitored to determine how different drugs (for example, Glucovance) help to control those factors.

  • From an administrative and prevention standpoint, relational databases can be used to identify at-risk patients, for example, those who have a family history of aneurysms.
  • Once identified, patients can be screened to prevent them from succumbing to a particular disease.
  • Needs for e-HIM Implementation To ensure that the goals of e-HIM are met, competent health information management (HIM) professionals with the skills to design, develop, and maintain databases are clearly needed.

However, Mon does not specify particular skills that would be required for development of useful relational databases.7 Presently, instructors in the HIM field teach skills based on their own experiences. However, a current problem is that HIM academics and professionals have given no concise definition of the core set of database design skills that students graduating from HIM programs should possess.8 The fundamental premise of the current investigation is that clear identification of skills will not only prepare students to develop relational databases using Access and SQL, but to better manage databases for clinical care applications, computerized physician order entry systems (CPOE), data warehouses, and data marts.

This investigation was inspired by comments made to the author while conducting site visits and informational interviews with database designers at various healthcare facilities. Many of the database designers voiced the opinion that students graduating from HIM and business programs do not have the skills or knowledge to deal with the complexity of organizing healthcare information into functional databases that could be used to improve the healthcare process.

This further supports personal communication and comments made in the Journal of Database Management by Frost, who describes the problem as not only a lack of definition, but one of inadequate resources: “If database texts are so good, why do our graduates emerge so poorly prepared for positions in industry?” 9,10 Furthermore, “Are the basic skills taught in textbooks the real skills students need?” The goal of this research project has been to identify the exact database skills that students need to be successful in database design and management.

To respond to this challenge, this investigation used a nominal group technique (NGT) to generate a list of database skills that would serve as the foundation for a course in database design and management.11 The author hypothesized that having a panel of experts identify this select set of skills would better prepare students to deal with the challenges they would face as practicing HIM professionals.

In addition, a composite list of skills identified by experts in the field would serve as a means of linking database theory to current practice.

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Which model is popularly used when assessing health care?

Considerations for Implementation – The Health Belief Model can be used to design short- and long-term interventions. The five key action-related components that determine the ability of the Health Belief Model to identify key decision-making points that influence health behaviors are:

Gathering information by conducting a health needs assessments and other efforts to determine who is at risk and the population(s) that should be targeted. Conveying the consequences of the health issues associated with risk behaviors in a clear and unambiguous fashion to understand perceived severity. Communicating to the target population the steps that are involved in taking the recommended action and highlighting the benefits to action. Providing assistance in identifying and reducing barriers to action. Demonstrating actions through skill development activities and providing support that enhances self-efficacy and the likelihood of successful behavior changes.

These actions represent key elements of the Health Belief Model and can be used to design or adapt health promotion or disease prevention programs. The Health Belief Model is appropriate to be used alone or in combination with other theories or models. To ensure success with this model, it is important to identify “cues to action” that are meaningful and appropriate for the target population.

What are the three most common health models?

Definitions of Health Definitions of Health Health is elusive to define and ways of thinking about it have evolved over the years. Three leading approaches include the “medical model”, the “holistic model”, and the “wellness model”. This evolution has been reflected in changing ways to measure health. (1) The medical model was dominant in North America throughout the 20 th century.

In its most extreme form, the “medical model” views the body as a machine, to be fixed when broken. It emphasizes treating specific physical diseases, does not accommodate mental or social problems well and, being concerned with resolving health problems, de-emphasizes prevention. This led logically to measuring health negatively, in terms of disease or death rates. Therefore health is defined as the absence of disease and the presence of high levels of function. A (rather wordy) example would be: “A state characterized by anatomic, physiologic and psychologic integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biologic, psychologic and social stress.” (Stokes J. J Community 1982;8:33-41) Applied to population health, the medical model might define a healthy population as one in which its members were all healthy (so life expectancy is high). Alternatively, the mechanical metaphor could be applied to the society itself: a healthy society is one in which the various systems (economic, legal, governmental, etc.) function smoothly.

(2) The holistic model of health was exemplified by the 1947 WHO definition, “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity”.

This model broadened the medical model perspective, and also introduced the idea of positive health (although the WHO did not originally use that term). The WHO definition was long considered unmeasurable as terms like well-being were seen as too vague. This was less because no-one could invent ways to measure them (indeed, psychologists had done so) but more because doing so required subjective assessments that contrasted sharply with the objective indicators favored by the medical model. The debates over what role patients should play in judging their own health reflected traditional (paternalistic) versus more recent (patient-centered) models of medicine. Applied to a population, the holistic model would again either sum appropriate individual indicators, or would record measures of the well-being of the population as a whole.

(3) The wellness model was championed by the WHO health promotion initiative.

In 1984, a WHO discussion document proposed moving away from viewing health as a state, toward a dynamic model that presented it as a process or a force. This was amplified in the 1986 Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. The definition held that health is “The extent to which an individual or group is able to realize aspirations and satisfy needs, and to change or cope with the environment. Health is a resource for everyday life, not the objective of living; it is a positive concept, emphasizing social and personal resources, as well as physical capacities.” ( Health promotion: a discussion document, Copenhagen, WHO, 1984.) Related definitions include some that view health in terms of resiliency (e.g., “the capability of individuals, families, groups and communities to cope successfully in the face of significant adversity or risk.” (Vingilis & Sarkella, Social Indicators Research 1997;40:159) Applied to population health, the definition might include elements such as the success with which the population adapts to change, such as shifting economic realities or natural disasters. An ecological definition is: “A state in which humans and other living creatures with which they interact can coexist indefinitely.” (Last JM. Dictionary of epidemiology, IEA, 1995:73) Other definitions are yet broader and introduce spiritual dimensions; see some of the,

Each of these models has something to contribute, though none seems ideal.

The advantage of the medical model is that disease represents a crucial issue facing society, and disease states are readily diagnosed and counted. But this approach is narrow, and in extreme form implies that people with disabilities are “unhealthy,” and that health is only about physical disease and mortality. A further potential limitation to the medical model is its omission of a time dimension. Should we consider as equally healthy two people in equal functional status, one of whom is carrying a fatal gene that will lead to early death? Further, if prognosis is not included, there is no virtue in prevention. The holistic and wellness models have the advantage of allowing for discrimination of people at the higher end of functioning; they focus on mental as well as physical health, and on broader issues of active participation in life. They also allow for more subtle discrimination of people who succeed in living productive lives despite a physical impairment: blind people or amputees may still be able to satisfy aspirations, be productive, happy and so be viewed as healthy. The disadvantage is that these conceptions run the risk of excessive breadth, of incorporating all of life. Thus, they do not distinguish clearly between the state of being healthy and the consequences of being healthy; nor do they distinguish between health and the determinants of health. For example, social health may be viewed as a determinant more than a marker of health status; it is subject to influence by very different factors. A further challenge is that by espousing a dynamic model of health (e.g., the capacity to rally from insults), healthiness predicts itself. Hence, we must also move from a strictly linear model of cause and effect toward a systems model in which health is a force, both input and output, and not merely an output of a linear process. Many of these ideas shown in these evolving models of health have been further developed in discussions of,

Related Definitions Impairment : “any loss or abnormality of psychological, physiological, or anatomical structure or function” (WHO International classification of impairments, disabilities and handicaps, Geneva, 1980) Disability : “any restriction or lack (resulting from an impairment) of ability to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered normal for a human being” (Idem) Handicap : “a disadvantage for a given individual, resulting from an impairment or a disability, that limits or prevents the fulfillment of a role that is normal (depending on age, sex, and social and cultural factors) for that individual” (Idem) Frailty : “a grouping of problems and losses of capability which make the individual more vulnerable to environmental challenge” Link to further discussion of

|| || : Definitions of Health

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