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What Is Healthcare Like In Thailand?

What Is Healthcare Like In Thailand
Infrastructure – As of 2019, Thailand’s population of 68 million is served by 927 government hospitals and 363 private hospitals with 9,768 primary care health units (SHPH clinics), responsible for Thai citizens’ health at the sub-district level. SHPH has played a significant role in the Thai public health.

Additionally, there are 25,615 private clinics. Universal health care is provided through three programs: the civil service welfare system for civil servants and their families, Social Security for private employees, and the universal coverage scheme, introduced in 2002, which is available to all other Thai nationals.

Some private hospitals are participants in the programs, but most are financed by patient self-payment and private insurance. According to the World Bank, under Thailand’s health schemes, 99.5 percent of the population have health protection coverage.

  • The MOPH oversees national health policy and also operates most government health facilities.
  • The National Health Security Office (NHSO) allocates funding through the universal coverage program.
  • Other health-related government agencies include the Health System Research Institute (HSRI), Thai Health Promotion Foundation (“ThaiHealth”), National Health Commission Office (NHCO), and the Emergency Medical Institute of Thailand (EMIT).

Although there have been national policies for decentralization, there has been resistance in implementing such changes and the MOPH still directly controls most aspects of health care. Thailand introduced universal coverage reforms in 2001, one of only a handful of lower-middle income countries to do so.

  1. Means-tested health care for low-income households was replaced by a new and more comprehensive insurance scheme, originally known as the 30 baht project, in line with the small co-payment charged for treatment.
  2. People joining the scheme receive a gold card, which allows them to access services in their health district and, if necessary, to be referred for specialist treatment elsewhere.

The bulk of health financing comes from public revenues, with funding allocated to contracting units for primary care annually on a population basis. According to the WHO, 65 percent of Thailand’s health care expenditure in 2004 came from the government, while 35 percent was from private sources.

Thailand achieved universal coverage with relatively low levels of spending on health, but it faces significant challenges: rising costs, inequalities, and duplication of resources. Although the reforms have received a good deal of criticism, they have proved popular with poorer Thais, especially in rural areas, and they survived the change of government after the 2006 military coup.

Then, Public Health Minister, Mongkol Na Songkhla, abolished the 30 baht co-payment and made the scheme free. It is not yet clear whether the scheme will be modified further under the military government that came to power in May 2014. In 2009, annual spending on health care amounted to 345 international dollars per person in purchasing power parity (PPP).

Total expenditures represented about 4.3 percent of gross domestic product (GDP). Of this amount, 75.8 percent came from public sources and 24.2 percent from private sources. Physician density was 2.98 per 10,000 population in 2004, with 22 hospital beds per 100,000 population in 2002. Data for utilization of health services in 2008 includes: 81 percent contraceptive prevalence, 80 percent ante-natal care coverage with at least four visits, 99 percent of births attended by skilled health personnel, 98 percent measles immunization coverage among one-year-olds, and 82 percent success in treatment of smear-positive tuberculosis.

Improved drinking-water sources were available to 98 percent of the population, and 96 percent were using improved sanitation facilities.

Is healthcare in Thailand good?

What Is Healthcare Like In Thailand Thailand’s healthcare system was ranked sixth in CEOWORLD magazine’s 2019 global healthcare index. Thailand offers a high standard of healthcare, and treatment can be both better and cheaper than in some Western countries. The majority of medical centres are based in the larger cities, especially Bangkok.

There are far fewer doctors in rural areas, especially in the poorest regions in Northeast Thailand. The medical sector is largely staffed by Thai nationals, but many doctors and consultants receive their medical training abroad. Thailand is dedicated to medical innovation, encouraging digitisation of services and supporting the adoption of new solutions, such as the use of medicinal marijuana, which is not widely accepted in Asian countries.

Thailand is one of the top five countries for inbound medical tourism, which accounts for an income of about $589 million, approximately 1% of overall tourism spending. Initially, tourists visited predominantly for cosmetic surgery, but they now also visit for orthopaedics, cardiology, spinal surgery, IVF, and transgender procedures.

This has led to an increased number of small private hospitals, which have staff with a diverse range of foreign language skills. In 2002, Thailand implemented their Universal Coverage Scheme (UCS), which provides healthcare for approximately three-quarters of the country’s population. Because the scheme is funded from general taxation, it only applies to registered residents.

This excludes undocumented migrants, stateless people, especially those from northern hill tribes, and refugees and asylum seekers. In 2010, a specific policy was established to provide healthcare for native ethnic minorities and Thai nationals without documentation. What Is Healthcare Like In Thailand Even though medical fees are comparatively low, it is advisable to have suitable insurance cover. Services must be paid for in full at the end of any treatment. Unless your insurer has a specific agreement with the hospital, you will have to settle your own bill and provide receipts in order to be reimbursed. Pharmacies will only fulfil prescriptions after payment has been made.

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Is hospital care good in Thailand?

Healthcare in Thailand is generally of good quality, especially in Bangkok, The city has a thriving medical tourism industry and many hospitals offer excellent care for a much lower price than would be charged in Western countries. Many doctors and other specialists speak English and have often studied abroad, though admin staff are less likely to speak English.

What are the health problems in Thailand?

Chronic disease trends in Thailand – Cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases, and diabetes are among the most significant emerging health concerns in Thailand, yet are often not detected until they have progressed to an advanced level.

  1. Nation-wide surveillance data on NCDs remain unreliable, though the MoPH has reported hospitalization data on morbidity (excluding Bangkok) from NCDs steadily rising from 1032 per 100 000 population in 2001, to 1674 per 100 000 population in 2004 ( Bureau of Policy and Strategy, 2009b ).
  2. As a result of excluding Bangkok, the largest urban area, these figures likely understate the true morbidity rate.

In 2003, the InterAsia Collaborative Group reported all major risk factors for chronic diseases, except smoking, are higher in urban compared with rural areas in Thailand ( InterASIA Collaborative Group, 2003 ). A comparison of mortality statistics reported by the Bureau of Policy and Strategy between the years 1977 and 2008 ( Bureau of Policy and Strategy Website, 2009a ) illustrates the significant shifts in leading causes of death in recent years (see Table 1 ).

Is surgery in Thailand safe?

As the largest cosmetic surgery company in Australasia, we are often asked “Is Thailand actually safe for cosmetic surgery?” Let us tell you the answer is 100% yes.

Is Bangkok healthcare good?

The system of healthcare in Bangkok is generally of good quality, and many doctors and specialists speak English. Private hospitals in Bangkok are first-rate and often employ staff members who have been educated in the West. These institutions also tend to be far cheaper than expats from Europe or the United States may expect.

  1. The high quality of care and low prices for treatment have led to Thailand’s rise as a medical tourism destination, particularly for cosmetic surgery, LASIK surgery and dental care.
  2. Some hospitals catering to overseas medical tourists resemble hotels rather than hospitals.
  3. This is especially true of hospitals in the south of the city, which market their medical operations alongside beach holiday packages.

Despite the reasonable cost of treatment, expats should make sure they have medical insurance in case of emergencies. Some of the most popular hospitals in Bangkok are listed below.

How safe is Thailand for tourists?

Crime – If you’re the victim of a crime in Thailand and wish to report it to the Thai police you should do so before leaving the country. If you do not, your case may not be investigated. Be aware that the way the media report crime is different from the UK.

  1. Local authorities, including the police, may give detailed press briefings.
  2. Be aware that posting images on social media of people drinking alcohol or wearing inappropriate clothing can result in fines and/or imprisonment both for the person who uploaded the images and the people in them.
  3. Be on your guard against pickpockets and bag snatchers, especially from thieves on motorbikes or when travelling in open transport like tuk tuks.
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Make sure valuables are kept securely and out of sight. Passengers on buses and trains have had items taken from bags while asleep. Violent crime, including gun crime, rarely involves foreign tourists, although in 2018 several foreign nationals were victims of gun violence in Bangkok.

You should take care when travelling in unfamiliar areas and avoid walking through less travelled areas alone, especially at night. Serious crimes take place throughout Thailand, and sometimes British Nationals are affected. Violent sexual assaults and unprovoked attacks have been reported in tourist destinations across Thailand.

These are particularly common during Full Moon parties and other similar events and late at night near bars. Drink spiking and drug assisted sexual assault have been reported in tourist destinations around Thailand, with both male and female victims. Be careful about taking drinks from strangers or leaving your drinks unattended.

Can I brush my teeth with tap water in Thailand?

Medical Services – Most of the major cities have world standard health-care facilities, particularly in the country’s capital, Bangkok. There is a very high standard of care provided in all of Thailand’s private health hospitals and clinics, so if you find yourself unwell or injured, don’t be afraid to seek help.

It would also be a good idea to make sure your travel insurance is squared away so that if in the case of an emergency, you do need to visit a doctor or hospital, you’re covered for any care. Along with hospitals, a lot of the hotels in Thailand also have doctors on 24-hour in case of guest emergencies.

Generally speaking, and officially, the tap water you’ll find throughout most of Thailand is clean. However, that doesn’t mean that you should regularly drink directly from the tap. You should always drink bottled water and it’s even advisable that you use bottled water when brushing your teeth.

Can I drink tap water in Thailand?

Can you drink tap water in Thailand? – The first rule about consuming water in Thailand is that you should absolutely remember not to drink tap water. Tap water is not drinkable anywhere in Thailand. On the other hand, tap water is not drinkable even after boiling.

The existing germs or bacteria are killed in the water after a while, but the heavy metals, nitrates and other substances still remain in the water. Some luxury hotels in Thailand even claim that it is safe to drink the water as they have filter systems that clean polluted tap water. However, we still not recommend doing it.

For the quality of tap water, it all depends on where you are in Thailand. In general, the water here is not free of mechanical impurities. It is not so much a bitten infection from water, but the water is not purified and not filtered to be suitable for regular consumption.

  • There can be some small microparticles in it.
  • Therefore, the tap water in Thailand is used only for cleaning, shower, watering plants or toilet flushing and other similar uses.
  • It is normally fine to use tap water, when it comes to brushing your teeth or washing fruits and vegetables that you then eat as locals do.

However, for those who are really concerned about hygiene, there is nothing wrong to use bottled water in these cases as well.

Do I really need vaccines for Thailand?

Do I Need Vaccines for Thailand? – Yes, some vaccines are recommended or required for Thailand. The and recommend the following for Thailand:,,,,, and, See the bullets below to learn more about some of these key immunisations:

– Food & Water – Recommended for most travellers to the region, especially if unvaccinated. – Blood & Body Fluids – Recommended for travellers to most regions. – Wounds or Breaks in Skin – Recommended for travellers to most regions, especially if not previously vaccinated. – Food & Water – Jab lasts 3 years. Oral vaccine lasts 5 years, must be able to swallow pills. Oral doses must be kept in refrigerator. – Mosquito – Required if travelling from a country with risk of yellow fever transmission – Mosquito – Recommended depending on itinerary and activities. Recommended for extended travel, recurrent travellers and travel to rural areas. Present throughout country, especially northern regions. Most cases from May to October. – Saliva of Infected Animals – High risk country. Vaccine recommended for long-stay travellers and those who may come in contact with animals.

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See the tables below for more information:

Food & Water Recommended for most travellers to the region, especially if unvaccinated.
Blood & Body Fluids Accelerated schedule available
Wounds or Breaks in Skin Recommended for travellers to most regions, especially if not previously vaccinated.
Food & Water Jab lasts 3 years. Oral vaccine lasts 5 years, must be able to swallow pills. Oral doses must be kept in refrigerator.
Mosquito Required if travelling from a country with risk of yellow fever transmission
Mosquito Recommended depending on itinerary and activities. Recommended for extended travel, recurrent travellers and travel to rural areas. Present throughout country, especially northern regions. Most cases from May to October.
Saliva of Infected Animals High risk country. Vaccine recommended for long-stay travellers and those who may come in contact with animals.

Sources:, and Various mosquito-borne diseases are present in Thailand. poses a threat to travellers to some regions of the country. Ensure you are protected with antimalarials., and chikungunya can also be found in Thailand. While there are no vaccines available for these diseases, there are steps you can take to prevent them.

What is the biggest concern in Thailand?

Thailand is considered highly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Extreme heat and rising sea levels threaten parts of Thailand, including the capital city of Bangkok. Erosion is considered a major problem due to climate change within the country.

What is the weakness of Thailand?

Weaknesses: Slow reaction to cyber attacks and heavy smog – Cyber-savvy but still at risk. Despite Thailand being one of the more cyber-savvy countries in Asia — nearly 85% Thai respondents have some sort of cybersecurity education — fewer than that can answer questions about how to protect themselves against attacks.

  1. With technology rapidly growing in Thailand, the country and people need to be able to protect themselves, reduce risk, and take appropriate steps if their system is compromised.
  2. Considering cyber attacks are on the rise, and becoming more sophisticated by the day, Thailand needs to be ready to counteract the latest malware and virus attacks.

High pollution in concentrated areas. Despite the initiatives to protect the land, certain areas are still heavily polluted. Bangkok specifically is swept up in the pollution — it hangs like a heavy cloud and never fully goes away. Breathing can be difficult — even wearing a mask to separate yourself from the smog doesn’t always help.

What are the health problems in Thailand?

Chronic disease trends in Thailand – Cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases, and diabetes are among the most significant emerging health concerns in Thailand, yet are often not detected until they have progressed to an advanced level.

  • Nation-wide surveillance data on NCDs remain unreliable, though the MoPH has reported hospitalization data on morbidity (excluding Bangkok) from NCDs steadily rising from 1032 per 100 000 population in 2001, to 1674 per 100 000 population in 2004 ( Bureau of Policy and Strategy, 2009b ).
  • As a result of excluding Bangkok, the largest urban area, these figures likely understate the true morbidity rate.

In 2003, the InterAsia Collaborative Group reported all major risk factors for chronic diseases, except smoking, are higher in urban compared with rural areas in Thailand ( InterASIA Collaborative Group, 2003 ). A comparison of mortality statistics reported by the Bureau of Policy and Strategy between the years 1977 and 2008 ( Bureau of Policy and Strategy Website, 2009a ) illustrates the significant shifts in leading causes of death in recent years (see Table 1 ).

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