What Is A Cream In Pharmacy?

What Is A Cream In Pharmacy
Cream is an example of a topical preparation. The pharmaceutical preparations that are used for the treatment of conditions such as rashes, skin irritation, stings, fungal infections, and other similar conditions are typically supplied in the form of a cream or an ointment because this provides an effective means of delivering the active ingredient directly to the area that needs it.

What is cream in pharmacology?

Uses – The formation of a barrier for the purpose of shielding the skin This can be a physical barrier or a chemical barrier, like sunscreen, for example.

  • In order to facilitate the retaining of moisture (especially water-in-oil creams)
  • Cleansing
  • Emollient effects
  • As a carrier for several pharmaceutical chemicals, including local anesthetics, anti-inflammatory drugs (such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or corticosteroids), hormones, antibiotics, antifungals, and counter-irritants.

Creams are semisolid dosage forms that generally include less than fifty percent of the vehicle consisting of hydrocarbons, waxes, or polyols and more than twenty percent water or other volatile components. Additionally, they could have one or more active pharmaceutical ingredients dissolved or disseminated in an appropriate cream basis.

  1. This word has traditionally been used to refer to semisolids that have a somewhat fluid viscosity and are produced as either water-in-oil (such as cold cream) or oil-in-water (such as fluocinolone acetonide cream) emulsions.
  2. One example of such a product is cold cream.
  3. However, as of late, the term has come to refer only to products that consist of oil-in-water emulsions or aqueous microcrystalline dispersions of long-chain fatty acids or alcohols and are cosmetically and aesthetically acceptable.

These products can be washed off with water and are more desirable from an aesthetic standpoint. The vaginal route of medication administration can be accomplished with the use of creams (e.g. , Triple Sulfa vaginal cream). Creams are another option for the treatment of sunburns.

What is cream example?

Cream is either the oily, yellowish component of milk or something that is manufactured from this material. Cream is described as the oily part of milk. A dab of fluffy white topping on an ice cream sundae is an example of cream. Another example of cream is whipped cream. A moisturizer that comes in a jar is a good illustration of a cream.

What is difference between cream and ointment?

What exactly is the distinction between cream and ointment? Creams and ointments can both have use in the medical and aesthetic fields. The proportion of oil to water that each one contains is the key distinction between the two. Ointments, on the other hand, typically include roughly 80 percent oil, in contrast to creams which contain both oil and water in equal quantities.

Are creams a drug?

Methamphetamine is most often known by the slang word “cream.” Methamphetamine is a highly addictive substance that is popular due to the excitatory effects it has. Cream is a white crystalline drug that may also be referred to as Blue Bell Ice Cream. It can be obtained in the form of crystal shards, which can be smoked, liquid, which can be injected into veins, and powder, which can be snorted.

What is cream and its classification?

1 Cream is a fluid milk product that is quite high in fat content. It is made by physically separating fat and milk from whole milk, and it takes the form of an emulsion of fat in skim milk.

What is cream used for?

Applications – The following are some uses of cream that may be found in the food industry:

  • As a component of a wide variety of cuisines, including ice creams, cakes, sauces, puddings, and many more.
  • In a variety of baked goods, such as cakes, pancakes, milkshakes, hot chocolate, fruits, etc., as a topping.
  • It also has uses in hot beverages like tea, coffee, and other similar beverages.
  • It is typically found in cream fillings, custards, and frostings found in baked goods.

What does cream stand for?

“C.R.E.A.M.” is an acronym that stands for “Cash Rules Everything Around Me.” It is a song that was released on January 31, 1994 by Loud Records as the third single from the Wu-Tang Clan’s debut studio album Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers). The song is by the American hardcore hip hop group Wu-Tang Clan (1993).

How many types of cream are there?

America (United States)

Name Fat content
Half and half >=10.5%,
Light cream >=18%,
Whipping cream >=30%,
Heavy (whipping) cream >=36%

What is difference between cream and paste in pharmacy?

Portions of medicated plasters and cutaneous patches that have been transferred – The parts have been moved to their respective dosage form monographs, which may be found in the same issue of Pharmeuropa: Patches has undergone a comprehensive revision so that it is now relevant to both transdermal and cutaneous patches.

This was accomplished by updating the monograph that describes patches. The change has been reflected in the title, which has been updated to reflect the change. It has been ensured that the dissolution test for patches may be used for both transdermal and cutaneous patches by modifying both the title and the language of chapter 2.9.4.

Dissolution test for patches. Both the volume estimated for the support and the area computed for the cover of the extraction cell in the section titled “Cell Method” have been updated to reflect the necessary changes. In addition to that, a fresh monograph for medicated Plasters has been put forth for consideration.

What is difference between gel and cream?

The following are the key distinctions between a gel and a cream: In contrast to a cream, which is opaque, a gel is see-through. Gels are typically colorless substances that vanish after they are applied. Creams, although having a color basis, are not visible once applied; nevertheless, gels are absorbed into the skin much more quickly.

Which is better cream or lotion?

Which One Should I Decide Upon? – When determining whether to use cream or lotion, the following are the primary considerations to take into account: The Type of Your Skin In general, persons who have dry skin benefit more from using creams, whilst those who have oily skin benefit more from using lotions.

  1. The more viscous formulations either serve to trap in moisture or to create a barrier that helps to keep the skin moisturized and supple for longer.
  2. Formulations that are less thick are more effective in preventing blocked pores and acne outbreaks.
  3. Lotions are another product that should be used for persons who have sensitive skin.

It’s possible that lotions are more appealing to men with facial hair since they don’t leave behind an oily residue on the mustache or beard. Weather The drier air that comes with colder weather contributes to an increase in the amount of evaporation that takes place at the surface of your skin.

The use of creams offers additional protection for the skin against the drying effects of wind and climate-controlled air. In contrast, lotions, which are items that allow for more breathability, should be used throughout the hot months. By doing our Personal Skin Assessment, we can evaluate what kinds of skin care products will be most beneficial to the overall health of your skin.

Our customer service professionals are also able to offer you with further information about our products so that you may select the cream or lotion formulations that are most suitable for your needs.

Why are ointments better than creams?

It is not easy for us to choose an eczema moisturiser that is appropriate for our child’s eczema, whether it be an ointment or a cream. This is especially true given the variety of alternatives that are available to us. It is essential to have a solid understanding of what is most effective for the skin of our child and what reduces the intensity of flare-ups.

Ointments are shown to be superior than creams when it comes to effectively hydrating and moisturizing the skin. Our eczema moisturiser is an ointment. Because it contains almost no water, it evaporates very slowly, therefore it retains its moisture for a far longer period of time than a cream would. The best approach to maintain our children’s skin hydrated and to allow their skin’s natural barrier to prevent moisture from escaping and irritants from getting into the skin is to moisturize their skin on a regular basis.

When shopping for an ointment or cream to treat your child’s eczema, there are certain qualities you should prioritize looking for in a product. What distinguishes an ointment from a cream is its thicker consistency. Creams are mixes that are made up of water and oil in equal parts.

  1. This quality gives creams a non-greasy feel to the touch, makes them simple to distribute, and makes them easy to remove with water.
  2. On the other hand, this also implies that creams quickly evaporate off the surface of the skin, which dries up the skin at the same time.
  3. Creams could also have stabilizers, which are ingredients that are added to the recipe to make it easier for the water and oil to combine, and they might also have more than one kind of preservative in them.
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Because your child’s skin may get irritated as a result of these additional substances, it is vital to read the label before purchasing the product. There is very little, if any water at all, present in an ointment because it is predominately composed of oils.

  • Because it is an ointment, our eczema moisturiser does not include any water in its formulation.
  • Because of the greater amount of oil that is included in ointments than in creams, ointments have a texture that is more viscous, greasier, and stickier.
  • Because of this, ointments are more efficient than creams in hydrating and moisturizing the skin.

This is due to the fact that ointments evaporate off the surface of the skin at a considerably slower pace, which allows them to retain moisture for a significantly longer period of time. This long-lasting moisturizing action prevents the skin from becoming dry and itchy while also preserving its natural suppleness.

Guidelines to follow when selecting an appropriate moisturizer for eczema Verify that the primary component of your moisturizer is not water by reading the label. If this is the case, it is possible that it will not be helpful for eczema skin since it would evaporate fast, giving the skin less time to absorb moisture and get hydrated.

Because eczema is not a condition for which there is a “one size fits all” solution, just because a moisturizer is successful on one person does not indicate that it will be helpful on every child; thus, we need to keep an eye out for what our child reacts to in an effective manner.

  • If you are aware that your child has an allergy to a certain component, you should give special attention to the product label before making a purchase.
  • Apply a very little quantity of a new moisturizer on the inside of your child’s elbow the first time you put it on them.
  • This will help prevent any irritation.

Do not wash the affected area for about twenty-four hours, and be on the lookout for any unexpected allergic reactions, including increased redness, discomfort, rash, or irritation. If you don’t notice any adverse effects, you may begin using the moisturizer frequently on your kid.

  • However, you should always keep an eye out for flare-ups and discontinue use if it causes your child’s eczema to respond negatively to the moisturizer.
  • When should you apply moisturizer to skin that has eczema for the best results? When applied to damp skin, moisturizers are at their most effective.
  • The ideal time to do this is within two minutes after getting your child out of the bath and patting them dry gently.

This is the most effective period for the skin to absorb moisture and keep it there, which of course is helpful in the management of eczema. At a minimum of two additional times during the day, apply moisturizer to your child’s skin. Julia and the rest of the Itchy Baby Co.

What do creams consist of?

HOW DO WE MAKE OUR CREAM PRODUCTS? In its most basic form, a cream is produced by combining oil and water. Because, as you are aware, oil does not easily dissolve or disperse in water, an emulsifier, which is a type of dispersing agent, is added to the combination in order to make this process possible.

Therefore, a cream is an example of an emulsion, as it is composed of both a water phase and an oil phase. Emulsifiers bring together, or “unite,” oil and water. Emulsifiers are defined as chemicals that are capable of interacting with both water and oil in the same process. One fragment of an emulsifier molecule connects up with the water molecules, while another piece of the emulsifier molecule hooks up with the oil molecules.

This makes it possible for the oil to spread into the aqueous medium as extremely small droplets that are surrounded by molecules of the emulsifier. Before the emulsifier is combined with the oil and water, it is customarily a waxy material, such as glyceryl stearate, that has been melted and combined with the oil.

  • Emulsions of “Oil in Water” and “Water in Oil” respectively To create an emulsion of oil and water, you need to start by spreading a smaller amount of oil into a larger volume of water.
  • Because the emulsifier molecules contain the minute oil droplets as they disseminate them across the water medium, which is referred to as the ‘external phase,’ the oil phase is termed the ‘internal phase,’ and the water phase is called the ‘external phase.’ The oil is “encased in the water” in this metaphor.

These types of creams have a more lightweight consistency, allow for easier absorption into the skin, and do not leave behind an oily residue. The formation of water-in-oil emulsions begins with the dispersion of a smaller amount of water into an oil that has a higher volume.

Because the molecules of the emulsifier wrap around the minute water droplets as they disperse over the medium of oil, which is the external phase, water is the internal phase in this emulsion. Oil is the exterior phase. In disorders such as eczema, creams of this kind often have an oily texture and are applied to the skin to create an oily barrier.

This barrier protects the skin and minimizes the amount of moisture that is lost from the skin. The Water Continuum The majority of creams include mostly (between 61 and 77%) of water as a component. The creams that are less heavy and more cosmetic in nature have a higher water content and a lower oil content.

This step of a cream’s production comprises the herbal components that are water-soluble. Except for our base cream, the water phase of our creams never consists of tap water or deionized water, as is the case with the vast majority of creams. We always include healthy and high-quality active components in the water phase, such as fragrant waters that have been distilled, powerful infusions and decoctions, and cold percolates of organic herbs.

The Oil Phase The percentage of a cream that is composed of oils can range anywhere from 11 to 24 percent. The heavier creams that are used only for therapeutic purposes have a greater amount of oil, although water is still the primary component of these creams.

Creams acquire a more luxurious and substantial texture as a result of the dissolution and incorporation of oil-soluble herbal components such as resins during this phase. After a certain amount of time, most oils will oxidize or become rancid if they are not properly stored. All of our creams and lotions contain antioxidants like vitamin E, which slows down this process and prevents it from occurring as quickly.

Creating a cream of wheat The components of the water phase are subjected to a slow heating process that continues until their temperature reaches between 70 and 75 degrees Celsius. At the same time, the components of the oil phase are being brought to a temperature of between 70 and 75 degrees Celsius in a container that is kept separate from the others.

When the temperature of both phases has been brought up to the appropriate level, the oil phase is slowly introduced into the water phase. During this time, the liquid is being violently whisked using a high sheer mixer. This causes the oil, emulsifier, and water particles to break up into very little droplets.

This makes the process of dispersing oil into water a great deal simpler and improves the emulsion’s capacity to remain stable. After many minutes of high-sheer, high-speed mixing, the mixture develops a velvety consistency. The cream is then moved to a low-shear low-speed stirrer, which slowly combines and spins the cream, giving it body while gradually lowering its temperature.

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What is the name of a steroid cream?

Corticosteroids that are considered to be mild, such as clobetasone, hydrocortisone skin cream, and hydrocortisone for piles and irritable bottom, are often available for purchase over-the-counter at pharmacies. Stronger versions are only available with a doctor’s prescription. These include beclometasone, betamethasone, clobetasol, fluticasone, and mometasone.

Do creams go into bloodstream?

Pharmaceutical Creams | Semi- Solid Dosage Form | Definition, Advantages | Classification | L~

When they are administered, medications that come in creams, ointments, gels, sprays, lotions, and patches will enter your body by penetrating through the skin and into the bloodstream. This will happen when the drug is applied. They can produce side effects if you use too much of the drug, and this can happen even if the medicine is merely meant to cure a skin disease or numb the skin before a treatment.

  • If you use too much of the medicine, they can cause negative effects.
  • After applying a numbing gel to their legs in preparation for a laser hair removal surgery, two young college students in two separate states tragically lost their lives a number of years ago.
  • Both lidocaine and tetracaine, which are anesthetics, were present in the gel at potent concentrations.

The purpose of the gel was to alleviate any discomfort that may have been caused by the treatment. The gel was provided to one of the students by the employees at the spa where she planned to undergo the treatment, while the other student picked up the gel from the drugstore.

  • The employees at the hair removal spas instructed the women to cover their legs in plastic wrap and apply the gel to their legs before the treatment.
  • Both of the women suffered from a deadly response to the gel because it allowed an excessive amount of the medication to enter their bodies via the skin.

On the route to her appointment, one woman suffered a seizure while driving to her destination. She fell into a coma, and she passed on the next week. The second lady suffered a seizure and was on a ventilator (a machine that helps people breathe) for two years until she passed away.

  1. These fatal responses were brought on by excessively high dosages of the anesthetic medications contained in the gel, as well as the application of the gel to extremely extensive portions of the skin (from groin to ankle).
  2. The application of plastic wrap over the skin led it to get warm, which in turn induced the adjacent blood vessels to expand, which in turn increased blood flow.

Because of this, an abnormally large amount of the medication was able to be absorbed and circulated throughout the body, which led to the ultimate development of hazardous effects. Antibiotics, cortisone-like pharmaceuticals, and antifungal medications are some of the various types of topical treatments that can be administered to the skin.

  • All of these have the potential to be absorbed, which may in certain cases result in adverse consequences.
  • These examples included drugs that were prescribed, however there have been instances in which people have been harmed as a result of applying an excessive amount of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines to their skin.

For instance, the overuse of cream to treat muscular pains was thought to have contributed to the death of a girl who was 17 years old. She competed in cross country and had been using the cream liberally all over her legs in an effort to alleviate the soreness caused by her workouts.

Both heat and physical activity can enhance the quantity of medication that is absorbed by the body. Methyl salicylate is an anti-inflammatory medication that is linked to aspirin and may be found in sports creams like Bengay and Icy Hot. Her body appears to have absorbed excessive doses of this substance, which can be found in these products.

These creams, when used properly, can give momentary relief from muscular soreness; however, their usage should be limited to no more than one week at a time. It is more risky to use too much of the cream over a period of days or weeks than it is to use a huge amount of the cream all at once.

All of these incidents are illustrations of the damage that may be caused by putting an excessive amount of medication on the skin. It is possible for medications included in creams, ointments, gels, sprays, and patches to enter your body in the same way as medicines are taken by mouth. However, this does not happen very often.

Be sure to use these medications exactly as directed, and pay attention to any and all cautions that may appear on the drug facts label that is included on all over-the-counter medicinal products. The following are some safety precautions and precautions that should be taken when using these drugs.

  • First and foremost, be sure to take the medication precisely as directed on the packaging or as your healthcare provider has instructed you to do so.
  • Additionally, do not take more of the medication than is indicated, and do not use it more frequently or for a longer period of time than is suggested.

Creams, ointments, gels, and sprays should only be used in little amounts and just where they are needed; they should not be applied all over the body. When the skin in certain parts of the body is rubbed together, such as beneath the breasts or between the buttocks, a greater amount of the medication may be absorbed.

  • Apply very little of the solution to these places.
  • Be careful not to have any cuts or scrapes on your skin, since this will also lead to increased absorption.
  • When using medical patches, be sure to only apply them to parts of the skin that are clean and free of any cuts, wounds, or other skin disorders.

If your doctor advises you to do so, typically while treating eczema, you should not apply heat, tight bandages, or any other coverings, such as plastic wrap, to any of these items. Heat, tight bandages, and other coverings can cause irritation to the skin.

Keep in mind that compression increases the temperature of the skin, which in turn increases the quantity of medication that is absorbed into the body. Do not subject your skin to heat (such as extended exposure to sunlight, hot baths, heating pads, or tanning beds) before seeing your physician. In light of the fact that some cosmetic procedures, such as laser hair removal, can be carried out in the absence of a medical doctor (e.g., the application of creams or ointments), you might want to consider having a pharmacist or doctor first review any creams or ointments that you are instructed to apply to the skin.

When purchasing over-the-counter or prescription creams, ointments, sprays, gels, and patches, it is important to consult with a pharmacist. This will ensure that you use the products safely, that you are aware of any potential adverse effects, and that you know how to treat any adverse effects that do occur.

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What is the difference between gel and cream?

The following are the key distinctions between a gel and a cream: In contrast to a cream, which is opaque, a gel is see-through. Gels are typically colorless substances that vanish after they are applied. Creams, although having a color basis, are not visible once applied; nevertheless, gels are absorbed into the skin much more quickly.

Why is cream an emulsion?

HOW DO WE MAKE OUR CREAM PRODUCTS? In its most basic form, a cream is produced by combining oil and water. Because, as you are aware, oil does not easily dissolve or disperse in water, an emulsifier, which is a type of dispersing agent, is added to the combination in order to make this process possible.

  • Therefore, a cream is an example of an emulsion, as it is composed of both a water phase and an oil phase.
  • Emulsifiers bring together, or “unite,” oil and water.
  • Emulsifiers are defined as chemicals that are capable of interacting with both water and oil in the same process.
  • One fragment of an emulsifier molecule connects up with the water molecules, while another piece of the emulsifier molecule hooks up with the oil molecules.

This makes it possible for the oil to spread into the aqueous medium as extremely small droplets that are surrounded by molecules of the emulsifier. Before the emulsifier is combined with the oil and water, it is customarily a waxy material, such as glyceryl stearate, that has been melted and combined with the oil.

Emulsions of “Oil in Water” and “Water in Oil” respectively To create an emulsion of oil and water, you need to start by spreading a smaller amount of oil into a larger volume of water. Because the emulsifier molecules contain the minute oil droplets as they disseminate them across the water medium, which is referred to as the ‘external phase,’ the oil phase is termed the ‘internal phase,’ and the water phase is called the ‘external phase.’ The oil is “encased in the water” in this metaphor.

These types of creams have a more lightweight consistency, allow for easier absorption into the skin, and do not leave behind an oily residue. The formation of water-in-oil emulsions begins with the dispersion of a smaller amount of water into an oil that has a higher volume.

  1. Because the molecules of the emulsifier wrap around the minute water droplets as they disperse over the medium of oil, which is the external phase, water is the internal phase in this emulsion.
  2. Oil is the exterior phase.
  3. In disorders such as eczema, creams of this kind often have an oily texture and are used to create an oily barrier on the skin.

This barrier protects the skin and minimizes the amount of moisture that is lost from the skin. The Water Continuum The majority of creams include between 61 and 77% water as their primary component. The creams that are less heavy and more cosmetic in nature have a higher water content and a lower oil content.

  1. This step of a cream’s production comprises the herbal components that are water-soluble.
  2. Except for our base cream, the water phase of our creams never consists of tap water or deionized water, as is the case with the vast majority of creams.
  3. We always make sure to include healthful and high-quality active substances in the water phase, and we do this by using distilled aromatic waters, potent infusions and decoctions, and cold percolates of organic herbs.

The Oil Phase The percentage of a cream that is composed of oils can range anywhere from 11 to 24 percent. The heavier creams that are used only for therapeutic purposes have a greater amount of oil, although water is still the primary component of these creams.

Creams acquire a more luxurious and substantial texture as a result of the dissolution and incorporation of oil-soluble herbal components such as resins during this phase. After a certain amount of time, most oils will oxidize or become rancid if they are not properly stored. All of our creams and lotions contain antioxidants like vitamin E, which slows down this process and prevents it from occurring as quickly.

Creating a cream of wheat The components of the water phase are subjected to a slow heating process that continues until their temperature reaches between 70 and 75 degrees Celsius. At the same time, the components of the oil phase are being brought to a temperature of between 70 and 75 degrees Celsius in a container that is kept separate from the others.

After both phases have reached the necessary temperature, the water phase will slowly receive the oil phase in a process known as phase separation. During this time, the liquid is being violently whisked using a high sheer mixer. This causes the oil, emulsifier, and water particles to break up into very little droplets.

This makes the process of dispersing oil into water a great deal simpler and improves the emulsion’s capacity to remain stable. After many minutes of high-sheer, high-speed mixing, the mixture develops a velvety consistency. The cream is then moved to a low-shear low-speed stirrer, which slowly combines and spins the cream, giving it body while gradually lowering its temperature.

What type of emulsion is cream?

Evaluation of Cold Cream – In order to determine the level of quality in a cold cream, you may execute the following series of tests. Description of the appearance Viscosity test: to forecast how easily something can be spread. The Standardization of Dosage Units (for medicated cold cream) Impurities Microbiological The examination of cold cream is the most significant test for determining the quality of all forms of semisolid preparations.

  1. Water content determination Assay (for medicated cold cream) You should be able to provide a response to the following question very soon.
  2. The answer to this question is an emulsion known as cold cream.
  3. Answer: Water in Oil (W/O) emulsion, or more simply put, cold cream, is a preparation that is oil-based yet semisolid in consistency.

References The names Remington, Joseph P., and Paul Beringer are all mentioned. This is the 21st edition of Remington’s “The Science and Practice of Pharmacy.” 2005: Published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins in Philadelphia.1996: Susan C. Wivell received a patent for “Clear Cold Cream Cosmetic Compositions” in the United States.

https://patents. google. com/patent/US5525344A/en The Water in Oil (W/O) emulsion is the straightforward response to the question “Which sort of emulsion is cold cream?” If you want to learn more about cold cream after reading this article on the sort of emulsion that cold cream is, you may want to read another article entitled Cold Cream: History, Formula, Method, Uses, and Evaluation.

Which of the following descriptions best describes cold cream as an emulsion?

How many types of cream are there?

America (United States)

Name Fat content
Half and half >=10.5%,
Light cream >=18%,
Whipping cream >=30%,
Heavy (whipping) cream >=36%